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6th World Conference of the International Federation for Public History
16 to 20 August 2022 in Berlin

Program

August 16 (Tuesday)

18:00-22:00 | Opening Reception at asisi Berlin Wall Panorama, Checkpoint Charlie Friedrichstraße 205, 10117 Berlin

*registration necessary via ConfTool (10 Euro fee)

Words of Welcome by
Andreas Etges (Local Organizing Committee)
Verena Blechinger-Talcott (Vice President, Freie Universität Berlin)
Cemile Giousouf (Vice President, Federal Agency for Civic Education)
Joanna Wojdon (Steering Committee, IFPH)

The asisi Berlin Wall Panorama will remain open for several more hours for you to experience. Also, you can visit the exhibition of the BlackBox Cold War across the street for free. In addition, there will be experts and a former local resident telling you more about Checkpoint Charlie. Free apps will provide additional info. Please download the award-winning app Berlin History beforehand and also the Cold War Berlin app that provides a special experience of the tank confrontation.

August 17 (Wednesday)

9:00-10:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ COMPETING TRUTH CLAIMS AND CONFLICTING AUTHORITIES IN POLAND: ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY HISTORY BETWEEN ACADEMIA AND THE PUBLIC | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Sabine Stach (Germany), chair
Michał Pawleta (Poland), Reconstructing the Past, Renegotiating Authority: Reconstructed Archaeological Sites in Present-Day Poland
Karin Reichenbach (Germany), The Threat of the Great Lechian Empire: Scientific Authority and Alternative Historiography in Contemporary Poland
Katrin Stoll (Germany), Documentary Truth about the Geographical Center of the Mass Murder of European Jewry by Nazi Germany: Epistemological Practices in Poland
Zuzanna Dziuban (Austria), Forensic Regimes of Truth and Disowning Politics of Holocaust Dead in Contemporary Poland

➜ PUBLIC HISTORIES OF SOCIALISM | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Bohumil Melichar (Czech Republic), Exploring the Vanished Socialist Space
Iana Nikitenko (United Kingdom), Second-generation Memory of Gulag: Stalinist Repressions in Post-Soviet Graphic Narratives
Alexander Svetlov (Ukraine), Museums´ role as sites of reassessment of the Communist Past


➜ PUBLIC HISTORIANS, CLIENTS, AND THE PUBLIC | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Jan-Christian Wilkening (Germany), Modelling Public Disability History: People with (Cognitive) Disabilities as Actors in the Formation of ‘their’ History
Joan Michele Zenzen (United States), Whose Side? Public Historians and the Public
Panayotis Gatsotis (Greece), Public History in School History Curricula: The Greek Case
Alexander Joachim Berner (Germany), Questionable commemoration of Nazi victims in a medium-sized German town: A speech, an assignment, and an unmistakable visit


➜ MEMORY, TERRITORY, AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN COLOMBIA AND ECUADOR | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Jimena Perry (United States), Throwing in the Towel:” Representations of Political Violence in Colombiaʼs National Museum, 2001
Fernanda Barbosa dos Santos (Colombia), “Capital in Conflicto”: Widening the dialogue and the collaborative work on conflict and resistance in Colombia
María Elena Bedoya (United Kingdom), “When our voices go silent”: Comics, environmental conflicts, and collaborative practices in the Ecuadorian Amazon


➜ WORKING GROUP: PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT IN WEB ARCHIVES | CONFERENCE ROOM II (KONFERENZRAUM II)
Valérie Schafer (Luxembourg), Niels Brügger (Denmark)


➜ WAR; MINORITIES AND MEMORY | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Aleksandra Kolakovic (Serbia), Return of the Forgotten – Nemanjic, Obrenovic and Kradjordjevic Dynasties in Serbia: Identity and Memory Issues
Snježana Koren (Croatia), Dialogue Document without a dialogue: current debates on World War II in Croatia
Piotr Majewski (Poland), The Belarusian and Ukrainian counter-memory of the postwar Polish anticommunist underground


➜ WORKING GROUP: WRITING HISTORY FOR ‘THE PUBLIC’ | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Catherine Fletcher (United Kingdom), Owen Rees (United Kingdom)


/ COFFEE BREAK /


11:00-12:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ PUBLIC HISTORY ON SOCIAL MEDIA - THEORY, METHODOLOGY, PRACTICE(S) | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Jason Steinhauer (United States), e-history: what is it, and why does it matter?
Mia Berg (Germany), User-generated content – user-generated research? Collaborative forms of researching Social Media History
Andrea Lorenz (Germany), Doing past-related Hate Speech – the dark side of history production on social media
Tom Divon (Israel); Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann (Israel), Can we learn about the Holocaust in 60 seconds? Modes of historical storytelling on TikTok


➜ HISTORY POLITICS: CURRENT COMPARATIVE INSIGHTS IN THE CROATIAN, ENGLISH, ITALIAN, AND POLISH SITUATION | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Marko Demantowsky (Austria), chair
Serge Noiret (Italy), A political use of the past? The Day of Remembrance in the XXI century Italian civic calendar
Terry Haydn (United Kingdom), Public history and the shaping of ideas about empire
Krzysztof Ruchniewicz (Poland), History politics in Poland before and after 2015
Barbara Pavlek-Löbl (Austria), History politics and coin designs: From kuna to euro in Croatia


➜ HERITAGE AND TOURISM | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Kate Terkanian (United Kingdom), Documenting the High Street: Collecting Memories and Reimagining the Future
Anna Clara Basilicò (Italy), Captive voices: prison tourism and civic engagement
Amy Luck (United Kingdom); Faye Sayer (United Kingdom), A comparative analysis of the wellbeing impact of engaging with digital and physical heritage
Raiza Denise Baez Calderon (United States), “A playground for the people of the States”: American heritage, colonialism, and the designation of the first National Historic Site in Puerto Rico


➜ COMING TO TERMS WITH THE COLONIAL PAST: REMEMBERING AND EXHIBITING COLONIALISM IN AFRICA AND EUROPE | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Norman Aselmeyer (Germany), Tourism Value: Engaging with the Colonial Past in Kenya's Museums
Dario Willi (Switzerland), Absent but still present: missing objects in African museums and their role in constructing a decolonial past
Daphné Budasz (Switzerland), Postcolonial Italy: Reflection on the Mapping of Colonial Heritage


➜ COMMUNITY ARCHIVES AND PUBLIC HISTORY | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Andrew Flinn (United Kingdom), The UK community archives movement: legacies of Dig Where You Stand, community-led heritage and publicly engaged history-making
Sara Buda (Italy), The Jewish Contemporary Documentation Centre - CDEC. Historiographical impulse and Public History pioneer
Magdalena Wisniewska-Drewniak (Poland), Public activity of community archives in Poland – examples from a multiple case study


➜ TENSIONS OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND DEALING WITH THE PAST: COMMISSIONED HISTORY AND KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION WITH AND FOR THE PUBLIC | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)

*Please note that this panel will be followed by a single presentation 

Stephan Scheuzger (Liechtenstein), Giving a Voice to People Who Did not Have a Voice Before? The Role of Testimonies in Truth Commissions’ Production and Presentation of Knowledge about the Past
Annette Weinke (Germany), Doing History, Performing Authenticity: The Role of Activist-Historians and Victim-Witnesses in the Bundestag Commissions of Inquiry into the History of the SED Dictatorship

Single presentation:

Christopher R. Lawton (United States); Harper Lawton (United States), Public History and Public Education in the Rural U.S. South


➜ WORKSHOP: ORAL HISTORY, MEMORY, AND PERFORMANCE | CONFERENCE ROOM II (KONFERENZRAUM II)
Workshop: Oral History, Memory, and Performance
Wendy Lement (United States), Matylda Tomaszczyk (Germany)

*Please preregister: wlement@gmail.com


/ LUNCH BREAK /


14:00-15:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ CONSIDERING HISTORY IN THEATRE, NOVELS, MANGA, AND FILM | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Ted Motohashi (Japan), Staging the Forgotten History of Colonialism: Public History and Dramatization of African Complicity in the Slave Trade
Emi Tozawa (United Kingdom), Feeling the Country of 'Swamp': Silence and the Narrative of Christianity in Japan, 1966-2016
Michihiro Okamoto (Japan), Time consciousness in modernity: How does science fiction manga writer think about the past?


➜ HOW TO THEORIZE AND PRACTICE PUBLIC HISTORY AT UNIVERSITIES NEW DEVELOPMENTS BETWEEN THEORY, PRACTICE, AND INTERDISCIPLINARITY | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Irmgard Zündorf (Germany), chair
Christine Gundermann (Germany), Theorizing Public History
Christine Szkiet (Switzerland), From Theorizing to practice Public History
Thorsten Logge (Germany), From History Types to History Type Competencies
Fien Danniau (Belgium), From Practice to Theory in Public History


➜ EMBODIED HISTORY: THE POTENTIALS OF PERFORMING THE PAST IN RE-ENACTMENTS | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Steffi de Jong (Germany), Re-enactments Avant la Lettre? Performative and Immersive Strategies for Appropriating History in the 19th Century
Kamila Baraniecka-Olszewska (Poland), Performing Authenticity in WWII Historical Reenactment in Poland
Juliane Tomann (Germany), Doing Gender in Reenactment? A case study from the American Revolutionary War


➜ FACING THE PAST WITH INFORMED CREATIVITY IN SOUTH AFRICA: NEW METHODS AND NEW AUDIENCES | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Julie Wells (South Africa), Stretching the Boundaries of History through the Creative History Methodology
Phemelo Hellemann (South Africa), Creative outputs as historical records: using film and participatory techniques as tools for documentation, Umzi ka mama history project as a case study
Richard Conyngham (South Africa), All Rise: Reviving lost voices of South African resistance through graphic history
Azile Cibi (South Africa), From Facts to Imagination in the Creation of the film Boundless
Likhaya Jack (South Africa), My talking feet: How pantsula dancing links to the past


➜ CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF PUBLIC HISTORY: EXPERIENCES FROM BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA, CROATIA, AND SERBIA | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Snježana Koren (Croatia), chair
Branimir Janković (Croatia), Perspectives of Public History in Croatia
Dennis Dierks (Germany), “Dealing with the past” as a travelling concept in the former Yugoslavia: A conceptual history approach
Nataša Jagdhuhn (Germany), The Memorial Center Lipa remembers – From a “museum of the people” to a “museum of the community”: Auto-reflective models for curating public history
Jimena Perry (United States), commentator


/ COFFEE BREAK /


16:00-17:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ TELLING ALL STORIES: INCLUSIVE PUBLIC HISTORY IN THE U.S. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Gregory E. Smoak (United States), Recovering Native Voices: A Collaboration Between the National Park Service and the Navajo Nation
Clarissa Myrick-Harris (United States), How They Lived: Reflections on the National Park Service’s Historic Context Study of the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‘Life Home’


➜ REMIXING INDUSTRIAL PASTS IN THE DIGITAL AGE | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Stefan Krebs (Luxembourg), chair
Julia Harnoncourt (Luxembourg); Jens van de Maele (Luxembourg), Organising a “Temporary History Lab” in Esch-sur-Alzette
Werner Tschacher (Luxembourg), Immersion and Audiovisual Elements in Historical Storytelling Approaches and Experiences from the “Remix Project”
Viktoria Boretska (Luxembourg); Daniel Richter (Luxembourg), Exhibiting the Industrial Past and Digital Storytelling


➜ WORLD WAR I, WORLD WAR II AND COMMEMORATIONS | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Lucy Moore (United Kingdom), Emotional Resonance, Local Government Partnerships & First World War Programming in Leeds
Chantal Kesteloot (Belgium), Belgium: From the Grandeur of the Commemorations to the Silence of the Pandemic
Andreas Etges (Germany), Honorable Soldiers, Courageous Resistance, and an Unbeatable Band of Brothers: National Narratives and Myths about World War II and Hollywood’s Portrayal of the War in Europe


➜ CONTESTED HERITAGE: THE GERMAN WAR CEMETERY MALEME ON CRETE (GREECE) AS A PLACE OF POLITICAL EDUCATION | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Corinna Kuhr-Korolev (Germany), chair
Albrecht Viertel (Germany), About the diverse demands on a new exhibition for the German military cemetery on Crete – A creative approach
Georgios Psaroudakis (Greece/Germany), A Cretean perspective on the Cemetery Maleme
Vasco Kretschmann (Germany), Educational Materials for the Maleme War Gravesite (Crete). A learning site for German-Greek youth encounters Danny Chahbouni (Germany), commentator


➜ WORKING GROUP: THE FUTURE GENERATION OF PUBLIC HISTORIANS: WHAT FUTURE AND WHAT FOR? EARLY CAREER PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC HISTORY | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Sophie Kühnlenz, Benet Lehmann, Elias Nüse, Judith Uebing, Cristina Urucu, Mia Paulus, Julia Göke (all Germany)


➜ WORKSHOP: MAKING HISTORICAL GAMES “GAME DESIGN, ORAL HISTORY, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FOR HISTORICAL EMPATHY” | CONFERENCE ROOM II (KONFERENZRAUM II)
Anh Nguyen (Australia)

Please register under: Anh.Nguyen.Austen@acu.edu.au

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August 18 (Thursday)

9:00-10:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ PUBLIC HISTORY AND THE POLITICAL USES OF THE PAST | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Serge Noiret (Italy), chair
Sylvia Bailey (United States), National Identity in Post-Cold War Germany: Multicultural Narratives in the Jewish Museum Berlin
Fabio Spirinelli (Luxembourg), Polishing the Image of a Nation-State: Luxembourg and the Uses of the Past since the 1990s
Vera Dubina (Germany), From “A polka dot History” to Public History: History scholarship in the Public Space of post-Soviet Russia


➜ TELLING THE STORIES OF THE PAST: CHANGING APPROACHES AND THEIR EFFECTS IN THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REGION | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Jelena Đureinović (Austria), Keepers of the Legacies of the People’s Liberation War: The Military, Veterans and Museums in Socialist Yugoslavia
Brigitte Le Normand (Netherlands), Rijeka Fiume in Flux: a mobile phone app for exploring the past of a contested City
Alexandra Zaremba (United States), Yugodom: What to make of the world’s first stay-over museum and its construction of the Yugoslav past?


➜ THE RESCUE OF JEWS DURING THE HOLOCAUST IN EUROPEAN MEMORY | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Erin Bell (United Kingdom), Nicholas Winton – the ‘British Schindler’
Ido de Haan (Netherlands), Guilt, pride and reputation: The memory of rescue of Jews in the Netherlands
Zofia Wóycicka (Poland), The „Righteous” as a Figure of Transnational Memory Politics

*This panel was organized and financed by the German Historical Institute Warsaw


➜ RECLAIMING THE (DIGITAL) NARRATIVE: CROSS-PROFESSIONAL ARCHIVAL COLLABORATIONS PRESERVING AND MOBILISING MARGINALISED COMMUNITY HISTORIES | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Alix Green (United Kingdom), Recording and mobilising the histories of now: ‘doing justice’ as public historians with and for marginalised communities?
Francesco Gelati (Germany), Making digital archival records available today and preserving them in the long term
Nina Schneider (Germany), Digital Human Rights Archives Activism: a transnational public history practice


➜ ART, MUSIC AND FILM | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Sigrun Lehnert (Germany), Are we History? Newsreels as Part of Film heritage and Source of Public History
Daniel Samaga (Germany), Staged Public Music History: The musical play "Beethoven – Ein Geisterspiel"
Corin Sweeny Deinhart (Italy), Cultural Translations: Art as Public History in Post-Democratic Kampuchea, Cambodia


➜ ONLINE AND OFFLINE: NEW APPROACHES IN DIGITAL PUBLIC HISTORY | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Charlotte Bosman, Local and Global Impact: The Anne Frank House Virtual Reality App
Clarissa J. Ceglio (United States), Courtroom 600: A Virtual Reality Encounter with Evidence of the Holocaust
Simon Karstens (Germany), History: The YouTube experience


/ COFFEE BREAK /


11:00-12:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ DEMOCRACY ON DISPLAY: REFLECTIONS ON THE NEW EXHIBITIONS OF FORMER STATESMEN AND REMAINING CHALLENGES | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Bettina Greiner (Germany), chair
Jason Berggren (United States); Adrienne Petty-Roberts (United States), Democratizing History: Researching and Remaking The Public Education Exhibits at The Jimmy Carter National Historic Park
Magnus Koch (Germany), Conflict and Debate: The New Permanent Exhibition of The Federal Chancellor Helmut Schmidt Foundation. A Curator’s View
Julia Hornig (Germany), Values on Display: The New Willy Brandt Touring Exhibition. An Educator’s View


➜ ORAL HISTORY AS METHOD FOR FACILITATING PUBLICLY ENGAGED HISTORY | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Philip Vincent Scarpino (United States), Oral History as a Means of Understanding the Shifting and often Conflicting Meaning of Place: Isle Royale National Park as a Case Study
Melody Hunter-Pillion (United States), Oral History as a Tool of Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Change
David Glassberg (United States), Oral History, Community Engagement, and Environmental Justice


➜ PUBLIC HISTORY – HISTORICAL CULTURE – HISTORY DIDACTICS: ATTEMPT TO CLARIFY A DIFFICULT RELATIONSHIP | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Wolfgang Hasberg (Germany), Four origins and their epistemological consequences
Luigi Cajani (Italy), Historical Culture, History Education and Public History: Towards a Theoretical Framework
Peter Gautschi (Switzerland), Encountering History through Design: the Art and the Science of Conveying History
Joanna Wojdon (Poland), History education, history didactics and public history: Mutual relations


➜ THE PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HISTORY AT NAZI RELATED HISTORIC SITES | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Marty Blatt (United States), chair
Matthias Hass (Germany), The House of the Wannsee Conference Memorial and Educational Site
Marta Kopiniak (Poland), The Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum
Andrea Riedle (Germany), The Topography of Terror Museum


➜ DEALING WITH DIFFICULT PASTS | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
David Young (United States), "Not Always The ’First State’": Publicly Rewriting the Narrative of Delaware's History of Lynching, Racial Terror, and Unequal Justice
Georgi Verbeeck (Netherlands), Memories of Colonialism in Belgium: Historical Controversies and Public Discussion.
Matilde Eiroa (Spain); Sergio Gálvez (Spain), Historical consciousness and memorial associative movement in Spain: the civic contribution to the knowledge of Franco's crimes
Gary Fred Baines (South Africa), Commemorative stamps as memorials to the South African national project


➜ WORKSHOP: #CHALLENGES – MEMORIALS, TIKTOK AND DIGITAL EDUCATION | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Johannes Lauer (Germany), Iris Groschek (Germany)


➜ INTRODUCTION OF THE CITIZEN SCIENCE PLATFORM EUROPEANA TRANSCRIBATHON.EU AND A HANDS-ON TRANSCRIPTION COMPETITION MINI-RUN PART 1 | CONFERENCE ROOM II (KONFERENZRAUM II)
https://europeana.transcribathon.eu/ifph-2022/

Frank Drauschke (Germany)


/ LUNCH BREAK /


14:00-15:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ QUESTIONING MUSEUMS: PERSPECTIVES FROM ANTHROPOLOGY, MUSEUM EDUCATION, PUBLIC HISTORY, AND PROVENANCE RESEARCH | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Christine Gundermann (Germany), chair
Tamara Ali (Austria), Traces of Industrial Revolution and Imperialism in Museum Education of a Technical Museum
Jamie Dau (Germany), Provenance Research on Ethnographic Collections from West Africa and Oceania
Sophie Kühnlenz (Germany), Women as Add-On? Gender Discourses in Technical Museums
Constanze Schattke (Austria), Indigenous Human Remains in a Natural History Museum: Display, Use, Analysis


➜ ENCOUNTERING GENDERED HISTORIES: RESEARCHING EXCLUSIONARY DISCOURSES IN POPULAR HISTORICAL CULTURE | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)

Siri Driessen (Netherlands), Power and Access in Military Contexts
Jasmin Seijbel (Netherlands), Sexism and Exclusion in Football Fandom and Holocaust Education
Lise Zurné (Netherlands), Sexualized Harassment and Intimidation in Re-enactment Communities


➜ RESEARCHING MOBILE LIVES – SOURCES, METHODS, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN DIGITAL PUBLIC HISTORY | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Rosalind Beiler (United States), “Worthy and Dear Friends”: Creating Collaboration through the Letters of Early Modern Religious Minorities
Ursula Lehmkuhl (Germany), To Those Who Stayed Behind: Immigrant Letters from North America and the Complexities of Transatlantic Public History
Casey Wolf (United States), Educational Materials and Citizen Scholars: Empowering Users in Collaborative Scholarship Networks
Jana Keck (Germany), Migrant Connections: Building a Research Infrastructure for Transatlantic Digital Citizen Scholarship


➜ IMMERSIVE MULTIMODAL VISUAL HISTORY: THE PANORAMA | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Molly Briggs (United States), Immersion in Paper: Mapping Socio-Cognitive Space in Stereographic Projection
Thorsten Logge (Germany), Reflections on Panoramas as Performative Historiographies
Nicholas Lowe (United States), Panoramic Image and Text Flows as Popular History in North American River Travel Ephemera
Sara Velas (United States); Ruby Carlson (United States), History Panoramas as Pedagogical Devices: “Shengjing Panorama”


➜ PUBLIC HISTORY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Michael Hammer (Austria), Opportunities and challenges in communicating public history: On the transfer between science-school-public in the context of Citizen Science
Joella van Donkersgoed (Luxembourg), Practicality of Public History: handling polyvocality, multilingualism and varying levels of engagement
Violeta Tsenova (Luxembourg), Designing with Genius Loci: an approach to polyvocality in co-design projects
Alain Roy (Canada), Citizen history and community engagement: a reappraisal of the professional / amateur relationship and its evolution in Quebec


➜ WORKING GROUP: REVISITING SHARED AUTHORITY IN THE AGE OF DIGITAL PUBLIC HISTORY | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Thomas Cauvin (Luxembourg), Michael Frisch (United States), Serge Noiret (Italy), Mark Tebeau (United States), Mia Ridge (United Kingdom), Sharon Leon (United States), Rebecca Wingo (United States), Dominique Santana (Luxembourg), Violeta Tsenova (Luxembourg)


➜ INTRODUCTION OF THE CITIZEN SCIENCE PLATFORM EUROPEANA TRANSCRIBATHON.EU AND A HANDS-ON TRANSCRIPTION COMPETITION MINI-RUN PART 2 | CONFERENCE ROOM II (KONFERENZRAUM II)
https://europeana.transcribathon.eu/ifph-2022/

Frank Drauschke (Germany)


/ COFFEE BREAK /


16:00-17:30 | IFPH Business Meeting | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)


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August 19 (Friday)


9:00-10:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ THE IMPACT OF COLLABORATIVE PUBLIC HISTORY PROJECTS AROUND THE WORLD | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Nick Barratt (United Kingdom), The Transformative Power of Family History and Personal Heritage
Timothy Compeau (Canada), Mapping the Loyalist Migrations: Descendant Communities and Public Historians in Collaboration
Mary Stewart (United Kingdom), Distant cousins, but somewhat estranged? Family interviews recorded by oral historians and by family researchers


➜ THE PARTICIPATORY ARCHIVE: USING DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY & CREATIVITY TO ENGAGE PEOPLE WITH PUBLIC HISTORY IN NORTHERN IRELAND | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Lynsey Gillespie (United Kingdom), “Dear Diary and Textile Stories”: From uncovering women’s diaries to re-imagining photographic collections
Bronagh McAtasney (United Kingdom), Archives can be fun and scary! Engaging young people with moving image archives
Laura Aguiar (United Kingdom), CollabArchive: Democratising Public History through Creative Volunteering


➜ HISTORY TRANSFER THROUGH TELENOVELAS AND SERIES IN LATIN AMERICA | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Stefan Rinke (Germany), chair
Mónika Contreras Saiz (Germany), “Any Resemblance to Reality is Pure Coincidence”: Broadcasting and Reception of Latin American Contested Pasts in Telenovelas and Series 1970- 2020
Holle Ameriga Meding (Germany), Archetypes of Political Resistance: Narratives of the Chilean Military Dictatorship in TV Series
Hannah Müssemann (Germany), The Reception of National Productions in an International Audience – The Effect on the Historical Consciousness by Watching Telenovelas and Series in the Latin American Diaspora in the United States
June Carolyn Erlick (United States), commentator


➜ FORGING NARRATIVES: HISTORY IN VIDEOGAMES AND THE HISTORY OF VIDEOGAMES | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Thorsten Logge (Germany), chair
Dany Guay-Bélanger (Canada), Strange Devices: Let’s Plays, Mods, and Marketing as Preservation Method
Adam Lefloïc-Lebel (Canada), Videogame Preservation: How Oral Histories from Players are Necessary to Bolster Videogame History as a Whole
Jakub Šindelář (Czech Republic), Various Dimensions of Public History in the WW1 Videogame Valiant Hearts


➜ MONUMENTS, MEMORY AND PUBLIC SPACE | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Fritz Kusch (Germany), A Hero of two Worlds? The 1910/11 Statues of Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben between Memory, Politics, and Diplomacy
Jon Berndt Olsen (United States), Crowdsourcing Memory: The Memorial(s) for Freedom and Unity in Berlin and Leipzig
Sebastián Vargas Álvarez (Colombia), Monumental interventions and appropriations of public space in the “estallido social” in Colombia


/ COFFEE BREAK /


11:00-12:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ THE USE OF INTERACTIVE AUDIOVISUAL STORYTELLING AND NEW MEDIA FOR HISTORICAL RESEARCH | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
Dominique Santana (Luxembourg), www.colonia.lu: An interactive and participatory transmedia project intertwining stories of steel-framed migration
Michele Lacriola (Italy), “The Italian way”: Public History and social media
Nicole Basaraba (Netherlands), A choose-your-own virtual tour web documentary for cultural heritage tourists to Australia


➜ HISTORICAL GAMING IN AND OUT OF CONTEXT: COMBINING THE ANALYSIS AND PRACTICE OF HISTORICAL GAME DEVELOPMENT | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Bram Peter De Ridder (Belgium), chair
Jason Steinhauer (United States), History gaming and e-history
Astrid Soetewey (Belgium), History gaming and cultural institutions
Alexander Vandewalle (Belgium), History gaming and literary studies
Pieter Van den Heede (Netherlands), Gameplay as historical experience: towards a typology of forms of ludic historical revelation


➜ MEMORIES OF THE LOST CAUSE. COMMUNITIES OF DEFEAT IN GERMANY, POLAND, RHODESIA, AND THE UNITED STATES | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Maria Kobielska (Poland), Lost Cause and Late Victories: “Cursed/Doomed Soldiers” in Polish museums & memory culture
Hanno Hochmuth (Germany), Spatialized Memories of the “South” and the “East”: Monuments, Museums and Movies of a Lost Cause in Germany and the U.S.
Tilmann Siebeneichner (Germany), Fighting and Writing: Rhodesia’s Lost Cause and Its Late Victories


➜ PUBLIC HISTORY IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICA: INSTITUTIONAL AND QUOTIDIAN PRACTICES IN CO-PRODUCING HISTORIES WITH COMMUNITIES | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Tshepo Moloi (South Africa), Oral History and Post-Apartheid Public History: Successes, Contestations and Practices in the Tembisa and Eastern Transvaal oral history projects
Arianna Lissoni (South Africa), Public histories of the everyday: reflections on three creative engagements with South African history
Noor Nieftagodien (South Africa), Ideas and Practices of Public History: Reflections on Community Histories in contemporary Johannesburg


➜ MUSEUMS | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Lauren Nicole Rever (Germany), “Not something to be proud of”: Trust and Authority in United States History Museums
Devin Charles Manzullo-Thomas (United States), Sacred Subjects: Engaging Religious Histories and Religious Publics in American Museums
Karolína Bukovská (Czech Republic), MUSEum+ as a Museum in Former Blast Furnaces (Ostrava, Czech Republic)


➜ WORKSHOP: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ORAL HISTORY I | CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Phillip Vincent Scarpino (United States)


/ LUNCH BREAK /


14:00-15:30 | Panel Sessions


➜ COLLECTING JANUARY 6: ARTIFACTS OF A DIFFICULT HISTORY | LECTURE HALL A (HÖRSAAL A)
E. Claire Jerry (United States), Collecting Political History: January 6 in Context
Frank Blazich, Jr. (United States), Policing the Battlefield: Collecting the Aftermath of January 6th
Shannon Thomas Perich (United States), Depicting January 6, 2021
Louie Palu (United States), Documenting Political Year Zero


➜ EMOTIONS AND AFFECT IN PUBLIC HISTORY | LECTURE HALL B (HÖRSAAL B)
Thomas Cauvin (Luxembourg), chair
Danielle Mahon (Canada), Embodied Landscapes: Considering affect in co-producing oral history audio walks
Petros Apostolopoulos (United States), Affective practices on Wikipedia users’ discussions about the 9/11 attacks
Kresno Brahmantyo (Indonesia); Muhammad Fauzi (Indonesia), Social Memory and the Media: Public History in Indonesia


➜ LEGAL GOVERNANCE OF HISTORICAL RESEARCH? RECENT LESSONS FROM UKRAINE, POLAND AND BELARUS | LECTURE HALL C (HÖRSAAL C)
Sabine Stach, chair
Georgiy Kassianov (Poland), The Law Abiding Historical Truth: The Case of “Holodomor Denial”
Kornelia Kończal (Germany), Mnemonic populism in Polish courtrooms and beyond
Felix Ackermann (Poland), Reinterpreting Genocide: State responses to the popular protest movement in Belarus
Juliane Fürst (Germany), commentator


➜ TRANSMEDIA HISTORYTELLING AND HISTORICAL MAPPING | LECTURE HALL D (HÖRSAAL D)
Karla L. Escobar Hernandez (Germany), Transmedia HistoryTelling and the Knowledge of Indigenous Legal Practices in the Past
Luis Antonio Coelho Ferla (Brazil), Pauliceia 2.0: an open and collaborative historical mapping project
Giancarlo Macchi Jánica (Italy), Historical-Web/GIS for public history


➜ NEW PATHWAYS FOR EXHIBITIONS | SENATE ASSEMBLY HALL (SENATSSAAL)
Sarah Weicksel (United States), Breaking Down Silos: Collaborating for a Different Kind of History Exhibition
Kathleen G. Franz (United States), The Making of Girlhood (It's complicated)
Katharine Klein (United States), Girlhood in 3D: Using new digital tools for interpretation and preservation


➜ WORKSHOP: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ORAL HISTORY II  |  CONFERENCE ROOM III (KONFERENZRAUM III)
Phillip Vincent Scarpino (United States)


/ COFFEE BREAK /


16:00-17:30 | POSTER SESSION | MEZZANINE


16:30 | DANCE PERFORMANCE “UMNQA! NEVER DEFEATED” | FOYER


What does a young man do when his mother has been kidnapped by conquering invaders? After 8 years he found the solution and briefly appeared in the historical records of 1820 South Africa. The two-person performance “Umnqa! Never Defeated” dramatizes this story. It stands as an example of how to use creative history to fill in the silences of the archives, finding the human element.
Performers: Azile Cibi, a poet who holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Rhodes University, and Likhaya Jack, a popular pantsula (high energy) dancer with a passion for historical stories. Both were born and raised in the townships of Makhanda (formerly Grahamstown), Eastern Cape, South Africa. They demonstrate how this style of history storytelling can be taken anywhere, ranging from international stages to rural villages to street corners.


➜ 18:00-19:00 | RECEPTION |  FOYER


19:00-21:00 | "Babylon Berlin" – Public History on TV |
MAX-KADE-AUDITORIUM (AUDIMAX)

* open to the general public


The panel discussion features Henk Handloegten, one of the directors of “Babylon Berlin,” film scholar Bettina Köhler, who worked on the costum design of the series, and historian Hanno Hochmuth, who was privileged to play an extra in season 4.
Moderator: journalist and writer Marion Brasch


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August 20 (Saturday)

Optional excursion Program

*registration necessary via ConfTool


09:00-15:00 |  BUS TOUR TO “SACHSENHAUSEN MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM” | “ZOOLOGISCHER GARTEN” RAILWAY STATION, HARDENBERGPLATZ 8, 10787 BERLIN

*Participation fee: 7 Euros

Language: English
Duration: 6 hours
Max. group size: 40 People
Meeting Point: Hardenbergplatz (“Zoologischer Garten” Railway Station)

Register here


10:00-13:00 |  BUS TOUR ”COLD WAR BERLIN” | “ZOOLOGISCHER GARTEN” RAILWAY STATION, HARDENBERGPLATZ 8, 10787 BERLIN

* Participation fee: 7 Euros

The bus tour will explore the most prominent sites of Cold War Berlin including Checkpoint Charlie, Brandenburg Gate, the Berlin Wall Memorial at Bernauer Straße. It will also focus on competing housing ensembles in East and West Berlin like Stalinallee and Hansaviertel and it will show how the Cold War is nowadays commemorated in Berlin.

Language: English
Duration: 3 hours
Max. group size: 40 People
Meeting Point: Hardenbergplatz (“Zoologischer Garten” Railway Station)

Register here


10:00-12:30 |  CITY WALK “BERLIN AS A LANDSCAPE OF REMEMBRANCE” | MEMORIAL TO THE MURDERED JEWS OF EUROPE, CORA-BERLINER-STRAßE 1, 10117 BERLIN

*Entrance free

Participants will receive information on the historical background of the respective monuments and the social debates associated with their creation. The design concept is explained. Depending on the interest of the participants, various questions of memory are discussed: Who is thought of and who is not? How are the monuments designed? How are the monuments located in the urban area? How important is the memory of Nazi crimes today? 

Language: English
Duration: 2,5 hours
Max. group size: 25 People
Meeting Point: Entrance to the Centre of Information

Register here


10:15-11:00 |  OVERVIEW GUIDED TOUR “FROM THE PLAYING MAN TO THE DIGITAL WORLD” | COMPUTERSPIELMUSEUM, KARL-MARX-ALLEE 93A, 10243 BERLIN

*Entrance free

In 45 minutes, participants will receive an overview of the development from the playing man to the digital world. The guide will tell stories about different parts of the exhibition giving a summary of over 70 years of computer game culture.

Language: English
Duration: 45 minutes
Max. group size: 15 People

Register here


11:00-12:30 |  GUIDED TOUR “THE MUSEUM BERLIN-KARLSHORST. PERSPECTIVES ON GERMAN-SOVIET HISTORY IN THE 20TH CENTURY” | MUSEUM BERLIN-KARLSHORST, ZWIESELER STRAßE 4, 10318 BERLIN

*Entrance free

In the building of today's Museum Berlin-Karlshorst, the Wehrmacht surrendered to all four victorious powers on 8 May 1945. The tour provides an introduction to the historical site of the end of the war in Europe as well as to Germany's only permanent exhibition on the war of extermination against the Soviet Union. A follow-up discussion will focus on the challenges for museum work regarding the war of aggression against Ukraine, which arise from the multinational board of trustees (Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Belarus) of the museum.

Language: English
Duration: 1,5 hours
Max group size: 15 People

Register here


11:00-12:00 |  GUIDED TOUR "REPRESSION - REVOLUTION - REAPPRAISAL": THE STASI RECORDS ARCHIVE AS A TOOL FOR MEMORY WORK, TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE AND EDUCATION | STASI RECORDS ARCHIVE, RUSCHESTRAßE 103, 10365 BERLIN

*Entrance free

At the historic site of the former Ministry for State Security of East Germany, colloquially known as "Stasi", its records are kept in an archive, that has been at the base of many memorialisation efforts, transitional justice endeavors and public outreach activities. Dagmar Hovestädt, head of outreach and research at the Federal Archives, Stasi Records Archive, walks the participants through the historic grounds, the archive and exhibitions in a discursive guided talk.


Language: English
Duration: 1 hour
Max group size: 15 People
Meeting Point: Entrance to the exhibition “Access to secrecy” (“Einblick ins Geheime”)

Register here


11:30-13:30 |  GUIDED TOUR WITH THE CURATOR THROUGH THE OUTDOOR EXHIBITION AT THE BERLIN WALL MEMORIAL | THE BERLIN WALL MEMORIAL, BERNAUER STRAßE 111, 13355 BERLIN

*Entrance free

Bernauer Strasse was a focal point of Germany’s division. The Berlin Wall Memorial commemorates this period in history. For the guided tour Curator Dr. Gerhard Sälter talks about the area at Bernauer Strasse and the process of creating the outdoor exhibition.


Language: English
Duration: 2 hours
Max group size: 20 People
Meeting Point: Entrance to the Documentation Centre

Register here


12:00-12:45 |  GUIDED TOUR “GDR AND GAMING” | COMPUTERSPIELMUSEUM, KARL-MARX-ALLEE 93A, 10243 BERLIN

*Entrance free

The 45-minute guided tour provides information on how the GDR dealt with video games and how inventive they were in developing their own software and hardware. With the help of such milestones as the Poly-Play or the BSS01, it is shown how they inventively dealt with the panel economy and tried to inspire young people for technology.

Language: English
Duration: 45 minutes
Max. group size: 15 People

Register here


12:30-14:00 |  GUIDED TOUR AT THE GERMAN SPY MUSEUM (“DEUTSCHES SPIONAGEMUSEUM”) | DEUTSCHES SPIONAGEMUSEUM, LEIPZIGER PLATZ 9, 10117 BERLIN

*Entrance free

The Tour through the German Spy Museum will provide insights into the secret world of espionage from the beginnings to the present. Given the special history of Berlin, the tour will also focus on different stories that happened right here in the Capital of Spies.

Language: English
Duration: 1,5 hours
Max. group size: 25 People

Register here


13:00-14:30 |  GUIDED TOUR AT THE LINDENSTRAßE MEMORIAL  | GEDENKSTÄTTE LINDENSTRAßE, LINDENSTRASSE 54-55, 14467 POTSDAM

*Entrance free

The Lindenstraße Memorial (Gedenkstätte Lindenstraße) is located in a former prison and court complex at Lindenstraße 54/55 in Potsdam city centre. In the 90-minute guided tour of the memorial site, visitors learn about the historic location and its past. They can see traces of the different periods of the site’s use as a prison and learn why people were sentenced and detained here between 1933 and 1989. By presenting the story of the site in its historical context, the tour gives an overview of political and racial persecution in Germany in the 20th century. 

Language: English
Duration: 1,5 hours
Max. group size: 20 People

Register here


13:30-15:30 |  GUIDED TOUR | DOKUMENTATIONSZENTRUM NS-ZWANGSARBEIT, BRITZER STRAßE 5, 12439 BERLIN

*Entrance free

Language: English
Duration: 2 hours
Max. group size: 20 People

Register here


14:00-15:30 |  GUIDED TOUR AT THE BERLIN-HOHENSCHÖNHAUSEN MEMORIAL  | GEDENKSTÄTTE BERLIN-HOHENSCHÖNHAUSEN, GENSLERSTRAßE 66, 13055 BERLIN

*Entrance free

The central remand prison of the East German State Security was located on the grounds. Between 1951 and 1989, over 11,000 people were imprisoned here for political reasons. Most of the area as well as the prison buildings have been preserved and thus offer an authentic impression of prison conditions and daily life in prison. Cells and interrogation rooms can be visited as part of the guided tour.

Language: English
Duration: 1,5 hours
Max. group size: 20 People

Register here


14:00-15:30 |  FÜHRUNG DURCH DIE GEDENKSTÄTTE BERLIN-HOHENSCHÖNHAUSEN | GEDENKSTÄTTE BERLIN-HOHENSCHÖNHAUSEN, GENSLERSTRAßE 66, 13055 BERLIN

*Entrance free

Auf dem Gelände befand sich das zentrale Untersuchungsgefängnis der DDR-Staatssicherheit. Zwischen 1951 und 1989 wurden hier über 11 000 Menschen aus politischen Gründen inhaftiert. Große Teile des Areals sowie der Gebäude sind erhalten geblieben und vermitteln Ihnen einen authentischen Eindruck von Haftbedingungen und Haftalltag. Die Tour beinhaltet einen Rundgang über die Außenanlagen des ehemaligen Haftortes sowie eine Besichtigung von Zellen und Verhörräumen.

Language: English
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. group size: 20 People

Register here


15.00-17.00 |  WALKING TOUR “JEWISH BERLIN” | “HACKESCHER MARKT” RAILWAY STATION, HACKESCHER MARKT 1, 10178 BERLIN

*Participation fee: 3 Euros

Language: English
Duration: 2 hours
Max. group size: 15 People
Meeting Point: Hackescher Markt Railway Station, Exit “Hackescher Markt” (in front of “am to pm”)

Register here


16:00-18:00 |  WALKING TOUR “BABYLON BERLIN” | "Rosa Luxemburg Platz", Linienstraße 227, 10178 Berlin

*Participation fee: 3 Euros

Language: English
Duration: 2 hours
Max. group size: 15 People
Meeting Point: Rosa Luxemburg Platz, in front of the "Volksbühne"

Register here


17:00-19:00 |  WALKING TOUR “COLONIAL BERLIN” | SAMOASTRAßE & KIAUTSCHOUSTRAßE CORNER, 13353 BERLIN

*Participation fee: 3 Euros

Language: English
Duration: 2 hours
Max. group size: 15 People
Meeting Point: Corner Samoastraße/Kiautschoustraße

Register here


10:00-18:00 |  FREE ENTRY TO ALL EXHIBITIONS AT THE DEUTSCHES HISTORISCHES MUSEUM | DEUTSCHES HISTORISCHES MUSEUM, PEI BUILDING, UNTER DEN LINDEN 2, 10117 BERLIN

*Entrance free

Current exhibitions: “Karl Marx and Capitalism”, “Richard Wagner and the Nationalization of Feeling”, “Herlinde Koelbl. Angela Merkel Portraits 1991 – 2021”, “Citzenships. France, Poland, Germany since 1789”

Requirements: FREE TICKET upon presentation of your IFPH2022 Conference badge/ID
Opening hours: Fri. – Wed. 10 AM to 6 PM, Thu. 10 AM to 8 PM

Register here


10:00-17:00 |  GUIDED TOURS AT THE MEMORIAL „HAUS DER WANNSEE-KONFERENZ“ | GEDENK- UND BILDUNGSSTÄTTE HAUS DER WANNSEE-KONFERENZ, AM GROßEN WANNSEE 56-58, 14109 BERLIN

*Entrance free


Language: German (Audioguides available in English, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Polish, Russian, French, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, Arabic, Hungarian and Dutch)
Requirements: FREE AUDIOGUIDE upon presentation of your IFPH2022 Conference badge/ID
Duration: 1 hour

Register here

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